=

Salvia




Product Image Item Name- Price
Salvia aethiopsis

Salvia aethiopsis

Lovely silvery hairy foliage that form a big rosette that morphs into a good 3 foot tall massive candelabra of white flowers the second year. Think S. argentea, but with more attractive flowers. Best to cut back most of the flowers before they set seed or it will be inclined to be a bit monocarpic. Zone 5, guessing. -Joseph
$12.00

Add:

Salvia argentea

Salvia argentea

Huge flat rosettes of incredibly fuzzy Lambs Ear foliage, it sends up a spectacular branching candelabrum of white flowers. Individual rosettes go monocarpic after flowering but in can be induced to produce offsets that will live on and flower in a year or two; ad infinitum.
$12.00

Add:

Salvia azurea

Salvia azurea

One of my very favorite plants, a plains native that produces dense heads of large, beautiful, to-die-for true blue flowers in late summer and fall. Tough, carefree, and drought tolerant, the only problem with this plant is that the 2-3 foot stems tend to want to sprawl and trail rather than stand up straight. If you really need them to be tidy and compact, cut them back early in the summer to promote branching, or better yet, space them around with other plants so the lax stems can trail here and there, displaying their perfectly sky blue flowers wherever strikes their fancy. Zone 4
$12.00

Add:

Salvia nemorosa 'Blue Queen"

Salvia nemorosa 'Blue Queen"

The nemorosa are staples of the perennial border, blooming for many months, Blue Queen is compact and free blooming with bluish violet flowers, all of the plants we list as nemorosa may actually be the x superba hybrid.____ZONE 4
$12.00

Add:

Salvia scleria turkestanica

Salvia scleria turkestanica

Permanent in our gardens via self sowing it is rather short lived with large showy bracts subtending the flowers, it is probably the most asked for salvia in our gardens.
$12.00

Add: