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A - Ac

DOES THIS FLOWER? Don't ask. A little basic biology is in order here. Does it reproduce? If not it has long been relegated to the fossil record. Does it set seed (here you can eliminate the ferns, mosses and their kin, ignore the whole Angiosperm Gymnosperm naked seed thing for now)? If the answer is yes, where did the seed come from? Apomixis and cleistogamy notwithstanding, this is basically a birds and bees issue and you may want to refer to a copy of Sex For Dummies. I really don't mind questions, I'll happily explain alternation of generations in ferns yet one more time, despite the fact that the whole prothallus-antheridium-archegonium-gametophyte thing seems to elude most everyone but please no more does it flower questions.



Product Image Item Name- Price
Acanthus syricus

Acanthus syricus

Leaves with many spines, they have lovely dense spikes of purple veined white flowers, 3 ft. high, best in a slightly shaded protected place; Syria to Greece.____ZONE 5
$12.00

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Achillea holosericea

Achillea holosericea

$8.00

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Achillea millifolium 'Little Susie'

Achillea millifolium 'Little Susie'

A shorter selection, 12-18 inches generally, a nice shade of pink. Like all of this species, tough and easy. Zone 4
$8.00

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Achillea x kellereri

Achillea x kellereri

A natural hybrid found in Bulgaria by C.F. Ball and introduced by Sündermann, parentage is a bit uncertain, A. clypeolata is almost certainly one parent the other being either A. ageratifolia ssp aizoon or A. depressa. Leaves are grayish green and provide a nice foil for the corymbs of white flowers___ZONE 4
$8.00

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Aconitum charmichaelii spatlase

Aconitum charmichaelii spatlase

Perhaps the finest of the Aconites, this imposing species is always in demand; the soaring spires of hooded blue flowers tower over the Tricyrtis and Cyclamen mocking the pathetic attempts of Mums trying in vain capture you eye.___ZONE 4
$15.00

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Aconitum kirinense

Aconitum kirinense

An unusual monkshood native to a wide swath of the northern half of China, reaching 3-4 feet tall with spikes of creamy white to pale yellow flowers in late summer and fall. This is a new plant for us, and apparently new to cultivation at least in the US, and there is no information about it in gardens, but based on the native range, should be happy from zone 7 to 4, probably best in part shade.
$8.00

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Acorus calamus variegata

Acorus calamus variegata

A strongly variegated form of our native species celebrated in poem (Whitman didn't tell you it was a dangerous hallucinogen) strange spathe and spadix flowers.____ZONE 5
$15.00

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Acorus gramineus minimus aureus

Acorus gramineus minimus aureus

One of those plants that should be in every garden center but is mysteriously uncommon in the trade. It is that most useful of plants that grows happily in shade but looks like a grass. In this case, a wonderful bright yellow grass, and a a dwarf one at that, less than six inches tall so it even looks like well maintained grass. Like all acorus, happiest when grown on the wet side, but doesn't seem to be terribly picky. Spreads by rhizomes to form a ground cover, though it hasn't made a weed of itself yet. Great combined with blue hostas, and I especially love it combined with black leaved ophiopogon. Zone 5
$12.00

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