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Hi - Hy




Product Image Item Name- Price
Hieracium panosum

Hieracium panosum

A dwarf bright yellow hawkweed, it is one of the more attractive species and worth a try if you are looking for something new, it hasn't been a weedy menace for us .____ZONE 5
$12.00

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Hieracium tarda

Hieracium tarda

According to Punnett, this is the cream of the crop; indeed most of the hawkweeds are exactly that; weeds (according to the RHS index of garden plants approximately 10000 different species of weeds). I find that number a bit hard to believe, but whatever the species total this is a very choice rock garden specimen that ranks very near the top____ZONE 5
$8.00

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Hylomecon japonicum

Hylomecon japonicum

A fantastic little woodland poppy from Japan, this forms low slowly spreading mounds covered in spring by myriads of Meconopsis-like yellow flowers. For all of you who have ordered it from the seed exchanges only to be disappointed when some big weedy thing germinated the wait is over. We finally have some divisions thanks to Punnett.,____ZONE 5
$29.00

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Hymenoxys (Tetraneuris) herbacea

Hymenoxys (Tetraneuris) herbacea

We're beyond thrilled to be able to share with you this incredibly rare wildflower, the lakeside daisy. There are only four remaining natural populations of this plant, one (the largest) in Ohio (see pictures by our friend Kylee Baumle here: http://ourlittleacre.blogspot.com/2011/05/visit-to-see-rare-lakeside-daisies-in.html), one in Northern Michigan, and two in Canada. There used to be an Illinois population, but it was growing on land owned by a corporation... a corporation that promised to protect them, and then decided that bit of land would be a good place to store some coal. Yeah. Just wonderful. Luckily, seeds were collected from the Illinois population before it was wiped out, and preserved by some wonderful gardeners, including Stan Tyson, who we got our plants from. The plants we have are the result of combing seed from the Ohio and the (now extinct) Illinois populations, so they include a wide range of genetic diversity of this incredibly rare species. Spreading these plants around to more gardens is a vital way to ensure another accident doesn't drive this species closer to extinction. Oh, and besides all the fascinating and important ecological reasons to grow this, it is a beautiful plant. Low masses of narrow, grass-like foliage only a couple inches tall, topped in the spring with loads of beautiful bright yellow daisy flowers. Grows native in cracks in limestone, so tough, drought tolerant, and carefree provided it has good drainage. Zone 5, probably 4
$12.00

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Hymenoxys acaulis v. caespitosa

Hymenoxys acaulis v. caespitosa

From Albany Co., WY, 7200ft, 2195m. Superb form with sessile yellow flowers on tight, multi-headed, silver rosettes. Almost as compact as H. lapidicola. On windswept chalky knolls.
$8.00

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Hymenoxys torreyana

Hymenoxys torreyana

A prolific bloomer with yellow daises for months and attractive grassy foliage these are from cultivated material from alplains.____ZONE 5
$8.00

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