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A - D




Product Image Item Name- Price
Actaea Pachypoda

Actaea Pachypoda

In late summer this easy-to-grow, deer resistant native woodland perennial produces big clusters of beautiful, long-lasting (if the birds aren't too hungry) white berries each with a small black spot on them which gives them the slightly creepy, but descriptive, common name of “Doll's Eyes”.
$15.00

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Arisaema triphyllum

Arisaema triphyllum

Our native jack, hooded blossoms striped green or purple with a white spadix hidden inside followed by large clusters of conspicuous scarlet berries. They are being decimated in many areas by wild turkeys. These avian rototillers are starting to rival deer and bunnies in terms of garden damage.
$8.00

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Asarum arifolium

Asarum arifolium

One of the commonest evergreen native gingers, leaves have a distinctive arrowhead shape and may be either solid green or marked with silvery blotches. Flowers are curious brown jug-like things.
$15.00

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Asarum canadense

Asarum canadense

Excellent carpeting plants for woodland gardens. Flowers are tubby maroon jugs concealed beneath the heart shaped deciduous leaves that rise 6" on silky petioles. Our native wild ginger is reputed to be an alternate food plant for the beautiful Pipevine Swallowtail.
$12.00

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Caulophyllum thalictroides

Caulophyllum thalictroides

Uncurling rue-like leaves glow with reddish purple, giving rise to clusters of yellow green flowers followed by glorious long lasting blue berries which are the main attraction and give rise to the common name Blue Cohosh.
$12.00

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Cimicifuga (Actea) racemosa

Cimicifuga (Actea) racemosa

Bugbane, Leopards Bane, Wolfsbane, wishful thinking at best, but great in terms of ornamental value, Bugbane puts on an impressive display in the late summer woodland garden sending its spires of white to six feet or more, bugs remain unimpressed.
$15.00

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Convallaria montana

Convallaria montana

The American version of Lily Of The Valley, this runs forming tufts a couple feet away from the parent plant but unlike the common version is not a nuisance, indeed in the wild, it is rather rare. Fred Case said he seldom encountered it while searching for trilliums.
$8.00

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Cypripedium acaule

Cypripedium acaule

The iconic and elusive pink lady slipper. A difficult plant for most people to cultivate, it requires very acid soils (pH 4.5), lay crowns directly on top of the ground, and cover them with sifted pine needle duff. Use care in watering until established. Not easy, but growable in the right conditions. Acidic, humus-rich woodland soil will be your best bet. Very rare.
$24.00

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Dicentra canadensis

Dicentra canadensis

An exquisite little woodlander, with attractive ferny foliage and pink tinged white flowers like a tiny Bleeding Heart; Squirrel Corn bulbs are naturally tiny like kernels of corn, but it can form wide colonies over time.
$8.00

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Dicentra cucullaria

Dicentra cucullaria

Almost identical to canadensis in foliage, the bulbs are much different and the fat white golden-throated flowers of cucullaria look like a tiny pair of white pants, not just any pants but Dutchman's breeches, it too can form extensive patches.
$8.00

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